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Blackspotted Puffer

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About Blackspotted Puffer Fish

Blackspotted Puffer fish (Arothron Nigropunctatus) is a type of marine fish that is commonly found in the tropical coastal waters of the Indian Ocean, including the Red Sea, East Africa, and the Maldives, as well as in the Western Pacific Ocean, including Japan, Indonesia, and Australia. They are known for their unique and distinctive appearance, which includes a round body shape, a spiky, bumpy skin texture, and black spots on their skin. They are also known for their ability to inflate their body when threatened, making them appear larger to predators. They are known to change color depending on their mood or environment and can live for up to 15 years in the wild. They have a highly toxic liver and should not be consumed by humans.

Puffers, in general, are my favorite fishes to meet from the more common species in the shallow waters. These charming creatures seem to be smiling all the time, even when they carefully observe you straight in the eye. Their facial resemblance to that of a dog makes them real underwater puppies and the best human friend. Just don’t irritate them too much because once they inflate their body, they also release poisonous toxins. It doesn’t have any serious threat to human life but it might kill some fish in close proximity.

Gray Blackspotter Puffer fish in Blue Bay, Mauritius. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

Details:

Appearance

The Blackspotted Puffer fish is typically brownish-gray-blue to yellowish in color, with dark spots or stripes on its body. Its fins may be yellowish or white in color. The Blackspotted Puffer fish may have different colors due to the different habitats in which they live. For example, they may be lighter in color in areas with more light, and darker in areas with more shade. They may also have different colors in order to help camouflage them in their environment, making it harder for predators to spot them.

My guess is it is the same individual. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

Behavior

Blackspotted Puffer fish are generally peaceful and solitary creatures, but they can become aggressive toward other fish if they feel threatened or are competing for food. They are also known to be slow swimmers and prefer to spend most of their time hiding in caves or crevices. They are known to be found in coral reefs, seagrass beds, and mangrove habitats.


Conservation status

Blackspotted Puffer fish is not considered endangered and is not a species of conservation concern. However, like many other marine species, their population may be affected by habitat loss and pollution. It is important to note that collection for the aquarium trade may also have an impact on their wild populations.

Gallery of Blackspotted Puffer Fish

 

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